Saturday, March 22 is World Water Day!

At IX Power we believe that the first and most essential obstacle that must be overcome in order to improve life on Earth is the lack of clean water. We are devoted to finding methods for cleaning dirty produced water – some of the most potentially harmful water that can be found – and turning it into clean water for use in irrigation, by livestock, and even for consumption by mankind.  It’s possible, with technology such as that we are currently working on and hope to introduce to you soon.

Holding place

Holding place

In the interim, please take a moment or several, on Saturday, March 22 to observe World Water Day – it will remind you just how important this resource is for everyone, everywhere!

Thanks to the art department at IX Power, we have some attractive graphics that will provide you with a view of the worldwide water picture for freshwater and surface water.  It’s interesting information!

 

IX Power advocates turning produced water into fresh water.

Only 1% of all the water on the planet is freshwater. This pie chart illustrates how that 1% is divided up.

 

 

 

IX Power advocates turning produced water into freshwater.

This chart further breaks down how the fresh surface water on the planet is categorized. Graphics courtesy of IX Power Art Department.

New OrganiClear™ Technology for Cleaning Produced Water from Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking) and other Oil & Gas processes to be presented at 28th Annual WaterReuse Symposium by IX Power Clean Water CEO John “Grizz” Deal

The water industry will get its first official and public introduction to OrganiClear on Sunday afternoon, September 15, 2013 at the 28th Annual WaterReuse Symposium in Denver, Colorado in the U.S. IX Power Clean Water CEO John R. Grizz Deal will present the new technology, which originated at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of Texas, and New Mexico Tech. It has been hailed as the most effective proven technology to filter and destroy toxic organic hydrocarbons, such as the notorious BTEX compounds, in “produced water” without creating an additional waste stream. Held in Denver September 15 – 18, the WaterReuse Symposium is the leading event in the U.S. for presenting the latest innovations in water reuse and desalination. More information about the event can be found at http://www.watereuse.org/symposium28.

A $40 billion per annum problem for the oil and gas industry, the handling, cleaning and disposal of produced water is gaining more attention from environmental regulators in the U.S. and other oil and gas producing countries every year. Produced water is a term to describe the polluted water extracted from the earth along with oil and gas. The water produced may include water from the fossil fuel reservoir, water injected into the formation (including the high pressure water used to fracture the rock formation—“fracking”), and chemicals added during production and well treatment processes.

The OrganiClear machine cleans water of its organic hydrocarbons to the point that it can be safely used for agriculture and livestock and, with additional processes, can also be used for community water systems.IX_PCW_Logo_Sept12

“OrganiClear will change how the world manages produced water from the oil & gas industry, mining industry, and in manufacturing,” explains Deal. “As part of an operation’s water treatment train, OrganiClear not only separates the dangerous organic hydrocarbons, it destroys them while creating no additional waste stream. While other existing processes for cleaning produced water leave piles of toxic consumables that then must also be disposed of, OrganiClear effectively “eats” the toxins leaving nothing behind for additional handling.”

The major constituents of produced water are salt, oil, grease, and various other natural inorganic and organic compounds, chemical additives used in drilling and fracking, and naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM).

BTEX is one set of compounds of organic hydrocarbons of major concern. BTEX is an acronym that stands for Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes, which are all closely related. These compounds are soluble in water so produced water from the extraction of crude oil is always contaminated with these compounds.

Unfortunately, BTEX is extremely toxic and dangerous to humans, animals, crops, and natural vegetation. Benzene is carcinogenic while Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes have harmful effects on the central nervous system. Frequently found together, the BTEX compounds can cause illness, birth defects, eventual death—and even immediate death if highly concentrated.

Thus far, the oil and gas industry worldwide has generally dealt with produced water by subsurface disposal, disposal on the surface (in ponds), and by cleaning it to a degree that it can be re-used in oil and gas extraction processes. Some operations have cleaned it to the point that it can be used for irrigation, although without the OrganiClear technology, that process is costly and damaging to the environment. Given the high cost of organics elimination, some oil and gas operators are forced to release their produced water untreated where it pollutes aquifers, rivers, and the ocean. OrganiClear solves this important problem.

“This is a global environmental issue,” said Deal, “because for each barrel of oil recovered, 5 to 40 times as much water is produced, creating the adage that ‘oil recovery is really water recovery with a bit of oil thrown in.’ Worldwide, the volume of produced water generated each year exceeds 70 billion barrels (1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons.

Produced water accounts for 98% of the waste products in the oil & gas industry. Each year in order to comply with local, state, provincial, and federal environmental laws, oil and gas companies spend an estimated $40 billion cleaning and/or disposing of produced water. Costs include transportation, pre-treatment, re-injection, and desalination, and vary widely depending upon the water’s properties, volume, and geographic location. Typical handling costs range from $2 to $10 per barrel of water, and can run as high as $15 per barrel. The cost to eliminate “everything but TDS*” using OrganiClear in produced water ranges from $0.28 to $0.50 per barrel.

“So, why not clean it for beneficial use or recycle it for reuse?” notes Deal. “When millions of people around the globe suffer from water and subsequent food scarcity, we need to clean as much produced water as possible and turn it into “found” water. OrganiClear can make a huge difference: for industry, for the environment, and humankind. The oil and gas industry wants to do the right thing with its produced water. OrganiClear helps them in that effort.”

IX Power Clean Water (pronounced Nine Power), is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico and is one of the IX Power Companies, a group that focuses on bringing game-changing safe power and clean water innovations to market. The companies also have offices in Washington, D.C.; London, England; and Moscow, Russia. Before starting the IX Power group of companies, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for four years. He co-founded Hyperion Power, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, along with the IX Power Leadership Team: Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, Randall Wilson, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass-produced, self-contained 25MWe nuclear power reactor that was factory assembled and safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck. Now known as a design in the Generation IV (GenIV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was designed to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to industry and remote communities.

 *Costs to reduce Total Dissolved Solids, TDS, vary widely given TDS quantities and discharge limits.

IX

IX Power Clean Water Acquires Los Alamos National Laboratory’s “Ultimate Solution” to Hydrocarbon Pollution in Oil And Gas Produced Water

DENVER, COLORADO, 19 August 2013 — A $40 billion per annum problem that has plagued the oil and gas industry for the last 100 years will soon meet its match. IX Power Clean Water (IX PCW), has acquired the patent rights to OrganiClear from Los Alamos National Laboratory and begun commercialization of the most effective proven technology to filter and destroy organic hydrocarbons in “produced water” without creating an additional waste stream.

IX Power Clean Water's "OrganiClear" cleans organic hydrocarbons - BTEX - from produced water from oil & gas, mining operations, and industrial processes like no other technology can.

IX Power Clean Water’s “OrganiClear” cleans organic hydrocarbons – BTEX – from produced water from oil & gas, mining operations, and industrial processes like no other technology can.

Produced water is a term to describe water extracted from the earth along with oil and gas. The water produced may include water from the fossil fuel reservoir, water injected into the formation (including the high pressure water used to fracture the rock formation—“fracking”), and chemicals added during production and well treatment processes.

The OrganiClear machine cleans water to the point that it can be safely used for agriculture and livestock and, with additional processes, can also be used for community water systems.

“OrganiClear will change how the world manages produced water from the oil & gas industry, mining industry, and in manufacturing,” explained IX PCW CEO John R. Grizz Deal. “As part of an operation’s water treatment train, OrganiClear not only separates the dangerous organic hydrocarbons, it destroys them while creating no additional waste stream. While other existing processes for cleaning produced water leave piles of toxic consumables that then must also be disposed of, OrganiClear effectively “eats” the toxins leaving nothing behind for additional handling.”

The major constituents of produced water are salt, oil, grease, and various other natural inorganic and organic compounds, chemical additives used in drilling and fracking, and naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM).

BTEX is one set of compounds of organic hydrocarbons of major concern. BTEX is an acronym that stands for Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes, which are all closely related. These compounds are soluble in water so produced water from the extraction of crude oil is always contaminated with these compounds.

Unfortunately, BTEX is extremely toxic and dangerous to humans, animals, crops, and natural vegetation. Benzene is carcinogenic while Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes have harmful effects on the central nervous system. Frequently found together, the BTEX compounds can cause illness, birth defects, eventual death—and even immediate death if highly concentrated.

Thus far, the oil and gas industry worldwide has generally dealt with produced water by subsurface disposal, disposal on the surface (in ponds), and by cleaning it to a degree that it can be re-used in oil and gas extraction processes. Some operations have cleaned it to the point that it can be used for irrigation, although without the OrganiClear technology, that process is costly. Less scrupulous operators, usually in evolving economies without strict environmental regulations, release their produced water where it pollutes aquifers, rivers, and the ocean. 

“This is a global environmental issue,” said Deal, “because for each barrel of oil recovered, 5 to 40 times as much water is produced, creating the adage that ‘oil recovery is really water recovery with a bit of oil thrown in.’ Worldwide, the volume of produced water generated each year exceeds 70 billion barrels (1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons), with 20 billion barrels generated in the U.S. alone. This equates to nearly 200 million barrels of produced water each and every day; enough water to flow over Niagara Falls for three months.”

Produced water accounts for 98% of the waste products in the oil & gas industry. Each year in order to comply with local, state, provincial, and federal environmental laws, oil and gas companies spend an estimated $40 billion cleaning and/or disposing of produced water. Costs include transportation, pre-treatment, re-injection, and desalination, and vary widely depending upon the water’s properties, volume, and geographic location. Typical handling costs range from $2 to $10 per barrel of water, and can run as high as $15 per barrel. The cost to eliminate “everything but TDS*” using OrganiClear in produced water ranges from $0.28 to $0.50 per barrel.

“So, why not clean it for beneficial use or recycle it for reuse?” notes Deal. “When millions of people around the globe suffer from water and subsequent food scarcity, we need to clean as much produced water as possible and turn it into “found” water. OrganiClear can make a huge difference: for industry, for the environment, and humankind. The oil and gas industry wants to do the right thing with its produced water. OrganiClear helps them in that effort.”

IX Power Clean Water (pronounced Nine Power), is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico and is one of the IX Power Companies, a group that focuses on bringing game-changing safe power and clean water innovations to market. The companies also have offices in Washington, D.C.; London, England; and Moscow, Russia. Before starting the IX Power group of companies, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for four years. He co-founded Hyperion Power, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, along with the IX Power Leadership Team: Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, Randall Wilson and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass-produced, self-contained 25MWe nuclear power reactor that was factory assembled and safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck. Now known as a design in the Generation IV (GenIV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was designed to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to industry and remote communities.

 

*Costs to reduce Total Dissolved Solids, TDS, vary widely given TDS quantities and discharge limits.

 

IX

 

Deborah Deal-Blackwell to present “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” at Denver Innovators Workshop on June 12

   

Deborah Deal-Blackwell

Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR

     People involved in new business startups, inventors and innovators, even those that have been in business for some time – all can benefit by attending the free Denver Innovators Workshop session “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” on Wednesday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m. at Cluster Studios. Presented by veteran marketer Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR, the two-hour event will cover how to start marketing your product or service and what business owners should do first, explore what business owners can do on their own, and when and how to hire a public relations, marketing or advertising firm. In addition, the Workshop will also present the latest available information about business exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities at the upcoming Denver Startup Street Faire in conjunction with Denver Startup Week. To ensure a seat, attendees should RSVP for the event at: http://www.denverinnovators.org.

     Deborah Deal-Blackwell is an Accredited Public Relations practitioner (APR) with 30+ years creating and handling public relations and marketing campaigns for a diverse group of clients from the Caribbean to Moscow, Russia and all across the United States.  Her early career in television was followed by leadership positions at two of Florida’s top advertising and PR firms. She also owned an operated her own successful public relations firm and was the CEO of Angel Flight Southeast, a regional non-profit. From her home base outside Washington, D.C., she has represented clients, including the Hyperion Power Generation small modular reactor company, before the U.S. Congress, Department of Energy, and many other federal agencies. Currently, she is the CEO of the non-profit IX Power Foundation and consults with a handful of clients offering innovative new products. She is a member of the National Press Club and the Public Relations Society of America, both in Washington, D.C., the Friends of the Gum Spring Library, and other organizations.

The Denver Innovators Workshop is a not-for-profit group of innovators and inventors, scientists and geeks, business professionals and students, who came together in 2012 for the purpose of helping each other succeed. In this process, the Workshop participants aspire to actually raise the number of new products, services and companies in the Greater Denver area, while boosting the area’s reputation for innovation.

In addition to its monthly meetings at Cluster Studios, the Denver Innovators Workshop is hosting the Denver Startup Street Faire.  Billed as a “Public Science, Technology, & Manufacturing Faire for Adults & Kids of All Ages,” the Denver Startup Street Faire is being held in conjunction with Denver Startup Week, and with support from the Denver Office of Economic Development and the nonprofit IX Power Foundation. The event will provide inventors, innovators and new businesses the opportunity to showcase their products and services to the public downtown at the Wellington Webb Building on Saturday, September 21, 2013.

 Press Contact: Claire Paulette        Claire at IXPowerFoundation dot org or (505) 661-1000, ext. 902.

International Women’s Day is Friday, March 8 – Concerns about Water, Literacy & Violence

Friday, March 8, is International Women’s Day.   It seems to me, unfortunately, that women in the United States do not observe this important date as much as we should.  Maybe it’s because, even with the inequalities that remain in our country, we still have it pretty good — good enough to make us complacent and forgetful even, of how much we have to be grateful for and celebrate.

But as the “lucky ones,” relatively speaking, I think we owe it to our sisters in other parts of the world that don’t have it so well, to observe this day and do something to help those women with less opportunity.

From my travels, experience, reading and just years of life on the planet, three of the things that strike me as core issues for women today, particularly in countries with emerging economies are:

*  Water (and subsequently health)    

*  Literacy / Education

*  Violence         

International Women's Day March 8 2013 - will these girls have a future as adult women? Will they even survive to become women?

International Women’s Day March 8 2013 – will these girls have a future as adult women? Will they even survive to become women?

Lack of Clean Water – and therefore health

Of the 1.3 billion people living in abject poverty, the majority are women and children. With this poverty, most often comes a lack of access to clean water.  In addition to the physical harm that comes with having to carry heavy loads of water (and its often not even somewhat clean water) long distances, women in poor regions with no access to running water lose a lot of time – time to take care of their children, educate themselves and their children, and time to to spend on a livelihood to improve their lot in life.

But, they also lose their health, which continues the cycle of poverty because they are too sick to work at jobs or raising food.

According to the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP), “37% per cent of the developing world’s population – 2.5 billion people – lack improved sanitation facilities, and over 780 million people still use unsafe drinking water sources. Inadequate access to safe water and sanitation services, coupled with poor hygiene practices, kills and sickens thousands of children every day, and leads to impoverishment and diminished opportunities for thousands more.  

The majority of people living in poverty are women and children.

The majority of people living in poverty are women and children.

In fact, every 20 seconds, a child dies as a result of poor sanitation. That’s 1.5 million preventable deaths each year.  

Poor sanitation, water and hygiene have many other serious repercussions. Children – and particularly girls – are denied their right to education because  their schools lack private and decent sanitation facilities. Poor farmers and wage earners are less productive due to illness, health systems are overwhelmed and national economies suffer. Without WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene), sustainable development is impossible.”

 Violence Against Women 

It is when trying to transport water to their villages on unprotected trips down to water sources that women are often subjected to violence via regional conflict. This violence against them often involves sexual brutality and horrendous acts. But, one of the biggest segments in violence against women is domestic violence. Statistics from the United Nations state that in far too many countries 7 in 10 women can expect to be beaten, raped, abused or mutilated in their lifetimes. Aside from the obvious results – death or obvious injury – this violence can result in physical, mental, sexual, reproductive health and other health problems, and may increase vulnerability to HIV.  

The World Health Organization has concluded that violence against women – particularly intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women – are major public health problems and violations of women’s human rights.  A World Bank report, which estimates that more women aged 15-44 are killed violently than die of malaria, HIV, cancer, accidents and war combined.

Studies have shown that for both perpetrator and victim, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality, and low education or illiteracy, play a major role in the problem.

Illiteracy

Which brings us to illiteracy.  In my neighborhood, we just celebrated the opening of the new long-awaited Gum Spring Library. On the first day over 6,500 people visited the library – many of those were women and couples with young children. More than 14,500 materials were checked out the first weekend. But, in way too many countries, a library – even the ability to read – is a luxury people will never live to see.  And this lack of literacy fosters not only conditions that lead to violence, but help to keep women, and men, in a cycle of poverty that includes a lack of access to clean water, which makes people sick and keeps them from working to pull themselves out of that poverty.

In spite of the fact that most development agencies identify women’s literacy as the single most important factor in development, one out of every three women in the world cannot read and write. And, in some countries, men would like to keep it that way.  Remember the attack in October by the Taliban on 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai for her attempts to promote girls’ education in Pakistan. 

Lack of water. Violence. Illiteracy.  They are intertwined in keeping women around the globe from achieving their potential and contributing to the betterment of the human race, the environment, and the planet.

On Friday, March 8, please observe International Women’s Day – make a vow to take a step – even just one small one within the next week – for the benefit of a woman somewhere who’s suffering, and for women everywhere. Make a donation, write a Congressman, talk to your daughters or a class at school or church about women’s issue such as domestic violence … if we all did SOMETHING, we could make a difference 

Read more at the following web sites:

Amnesty International   

International Center for Research on Women      

UN Women – the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women     

World Health Organization    

CNN – “interesting story on women by the numbers” 

Die Bundesregierung handelt dumm

For a culture so steeped in logic and science, it’s surprising Germany has made the most expensive and silly decision concerning its energy independence. Not only will retiring their nuclear power fleet cost them ~$1.5 TRILLION, they will be forced to purchase electricity from neighboring countries such as France, which will continue to generate almost all of its baseload via safe, clean, affordable nuclear power.

Dummkopfs!

NUCLEAR POLICIES: Trillion-euro cost of German energy transition
Germany’s plan to transform its energy system to one reliant on renewable power as it phases out nuclear energy could cost up to €1 trillion, German energy and environment minister Peter Altmaier has publicly admitted.

Grizz Deal to speak on Small & Modular Reactors in London at NIA conference

What’s happening with Small & Modular Reactors now?  Find out when John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC will provide an overview on the small modular reactors (SMR) industry at the Nuclear Industry Association’s “Near Term SMRs in the U.K.” event on January 30 in London.      

John R. Deal, aka “Grizz,” will sharing the latest information on Small & Modular Reactors at the NIA in London January 30, 2012.

The event will also feature presentations by industry luminaries such as  Lord John Hutton, Chairman of the NIA, and Alexander Bychkov, Deputy Director General at the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). Sponsored by Eversheds, as a public service attendance the event is open to all for a nominal fee of GBP 75.  To register, send an email to Stephanie McKenna whose address is located on the NIA web site. 

IX Power is an safe energy and clean water technology innovation firm based in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Before starting IX Power, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for five years. He co-founded Hyperion, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, with Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass produced, self-contained 25MWe power reactor safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck after complete factory assembly. Now known as a design in the generation IV (Gen IV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was created to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to remote communities outside the U.S. and industrial and mining operations.

Before starting Hyperion, Deal served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging, and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful company spinouts from a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) technology transfer effort. Additionally, Deal served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation, and as Visiting Entrepreneur at LANL. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. He is an adjunct faculty member of the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo. He is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures.

IX Power is working with an international team of scientists and strategists to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies including the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream. The company’s main offices are in Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., and London, England.

 –IX–

What’s Next for Small Modular Reactors in the United States?

A number of countries have SMRs (Small Modular Reactors) under development.  Russia has been working on various models for some time and is famous for its RITM-200, the reactor powering its new nuclear icebreaker. Most recently South Korea announced that it has received its own state regulator approval for the SMART SMR and would soon be selling it around the world.  

Read the SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs report – link at the bottom of the page.

And, the U.S.?  The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy issued a Funding Announcement Opportunity (FOA) for a Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support Program  back on March 22, 2012. This government-industry cost share program was  for the design certification and licensing of up to two light water SMRs. Several applied, recently only one – B&W’s mPower design – was awarded funding.

On April 3, 2012, just weeks after the original FOA from the DOE came out in March, but well before the award was made, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu charged the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) with creating a subcommittee to report on what the U.S. should do above and beyond the existing FOA for two light water reactors. Secretary Chu wrote, “The broad purpose of the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs is to advise the Secretary on ways to advance this technology to achieve a global leadership role in civil nuclear technology for the United States, and ways for DOE to accelerate that role.”

Specifically, Secretary Chu charged, “Looking beyond the current DOE program authorized by Congress and begun by the FOA, this SEAB Subcommittee will: (1) Identify areas in which standards for safety, security and nonproliferation should be developed for SMRs to enhance U.S. leadership in civil nuclear energy, and (2) Identify challenges, uncertainties and risks to commercialization and provide advice on policies and other approaches that may be appropriate to manage these risks and accelerate deployment in support of national goals.”

I attended the “open meeting” in the Spring and came back and put the question to several of the “Linked-In’ groups on nuclear power:  “What would you advise the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs?”

There was a huge response.  After the discussions had gone on for a couple of months, I gathered the input with everyone’s consent and contact information and sent it in one very long letter to Dr. Nicholas M. Donofrio, Chairman of the SMR subcommittee. Before Thanksgiving, I received a letter back thanking everyone who participated on “Linked-In” and with the link to the completed report that was approved by the SEAB main committee.  Here it is: Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs.

In another blog entry – and maybe on Linked-In – we’ll discuss some of the contents of the report.  In the interim, thanks to everyone who participated in the discussion via the various nuclear groups back during the summer of 2012 …!  Keep speaking up!  Happy Holidays!

Again, here’s the pertinent links:

Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs

The subcommittee’s original marching orders

The DOE’s web site on SMRs

IX Power Announces Members of Company Advisory Board

PRESS RELEASE

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, 25 July 2012 – IX Power LLC, the technology transfer company specializing in commercializing safe power and clean water technologies from U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, has announced the composition of its company Advisory Board. CEO John R. Grizz Deal said that the following industry experts had been appointed: Mr. Alun Cole, Esq., Dr. Carol Bell, Dr. Robert Bednarz, Mr. Michael Crawford, and Mr. David Suratgar. The members will assist the management team in a variety of ways, including assessment of technology options, development of new technologies, and utilization of breakthrough innovations.

“We are privileged to have a board with a unique breadth of experience and talent,” said Deal. “Each member is a leader in their respective industry and all have a dynamic understanding of the international opportunities for the development of the clean water and safe power products we are taking to market. The contributions of the team will play an important role in IX Power’s mission of becoming a leading provider of safe power and clean water solutions for use in community, industry, government, and military applications.”

Robert Bednarz, PhD, an esteemed professor at Texas A&M University, is a recognized global expert in economic geography; and Carol Bell, PhD, is the former Managing Director of Chase Manhattan Bank’s Global Oil & Gas Group. Alun Cole, a Solicitor of the Senior Courts of England and Wales, is a highly-regarded attorney with extensive experience in international capital development. Michael Crawford, a partner at Denver-based Q Advisors, is continuing a notable career in investment banking that has allowed him to work in a diverse set of industries; and David Suratgar, Chairman of BMCE Bank International and has served as senior legal counsel at the World Bank and as special legal advisor to the Bank of England and the European Investment Bank. All have been widely published and have served on the boards of distinguished organizations around the globe. 

More detailed information about them can be obtained at http://ixpower.com/about/advisory-board/.

IX Power is working to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies that originated from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. An example of one of the technologies is the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream.

The founders of IX Power, comprised of John R. (Grizz) Deal, Randall Wilson, L. Robert Libutti, Otis “Pete” Peterson, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell, are renowned for their commercialization of the Hyperion Power SMR (small, modular nuclear power reactor) from LANL that is safe and small enough to be transported on the back of a truck. Today, under their new company IX Power, their interests have been expanded to include every type of clean energy technology — wind, solar, bio fuels, geothermal, and nuclear. The company and its non-profit foundation are based in Los Alamos, New Mexico and have offices in Denver, Colorado; Washington, D.C.; and London, England.

 

— IX —

 

Lots of comments on Small Modular Reactors – join in!

 

LEAVE COMMENTS ON OUR BLOG, or go to the LINKED-IN Page where it was started:

CLICK HERE to join the Discussion on LINKED-IN

There’s a hot discussion, with lots of good input, on SMRs that’s on the Linked-In group page “Nuclear Power – the Next Generation” Group. The discussion has been going on for some time now and is buried in the back. Anyone new to this group would not know its going on – so I’m just providing a little heads -up here and a direct link to the discussion…

IX Power is going to run off all the comments and send them over to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB), Small Modular Reactor Subcommittee (SMR) at the U.S. DOE  (Department of Energy).  This subcommittee apparently began its work in March 2012 and is to report back to the parent SEAB by this coming October. We will run off the comments at the end of June.

Any questions, just let us know!  Thank you!  Background on the SEAB follows below …

Continue reading