Deborah Deal-Blackwell to present “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” at Denver Innovators Workshop on June 12

   

Deborah Deal-Blackwell

Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR

     People involved in new business startups, inventors and innovators, even those that have been in business for some time – all can benefit by attending the free Denver Innovators Workshop session “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” on Wednesday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m. at Cluster Studios. Presented by veteran marketer Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR, the two-hour event will cover how to start marketing your product or service and what business owners should do first, explore what business owners can do on their own, and when and how to hire a public relations, marketing or advertising firm. In addition, the Workshop will also present the latest available information about business exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities at the upcoming Denver Startup Street Faire in conjunction with Denver Startup Week. To ensure a seat, attendees should RSVP for the event at: http://www.denverinnovators.org.

     Deborah Deal-Blackwell is an Accredited Public Relations practitioner (APR) with 30+ years creating and handling public relations and marketing campaigns for a diverse group of clients from the Caribbean to Moscow, Russia and all across the United States.  Her early career in television was followed by leadership positions at two of Florida’s top advertising and PR firms. She also owned an operated her own successful public relations firm and was the CEO of Angel Flight Southeast, a regional non-profit. From her home base outside Washington, D.C., she has represented clients, including the Hyperion Power Generation small modular reactor company, before the U.S. Congress, Department of Energy, and many other federal agencies. Currently, she is the CEO of the non-profit IX Power Foundation and consults with a handful of clients offering innovative new products. She is a member of the National Press Club and the Public Relations Society of America, both in Washington, D.C., the Friends of the Gum Spring Library, and other organizations.

The Denver Innovators Workshop is a not-for-profit group of innovators and inventors, scientists and geeks, business professionals and students, who came together in 2012 for the purpose of helping each other succeed. In this process, the Workshop participants aspire to actually raise the number of new products, services and companies in the Greater Denver area, while boosting the area’s reputation for innovation.

In addition to its monthly meetings at Cluster Studios, the Denver Innovators Workshop is hosting the Denver Startup Street Faire.  Billed as a “Public Science, Technology, & Manufacturing Faire for Adults & Kids of All Ages,” the Denver Startup Street Faire is being held in conjunction with Denver Startup Week, and with support from the Denver Office of Economic Development and the nonprofit IX Power Foundation. The event will provide inventors, innovators and new businesses the opportunity to showcase their products and services to the public downtown at the Wellington Webb Building on Saturday, September 21, 2013.

 Press Contact: Claire Paulette        Claire at IXPowerFoundation dot org or (505) 661-1000, ext. 902.

Grizz Deal to speak on Small & Modular Reactors in London at NIA conference

What’s happening with Small & Modular Reactors now?  Find out when John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC will provide an overview on the small modular reactors (SMR) industry at the Nuclear Industry Association’s “Near Term SMRs in the U.K.” event on January 30 in London.      

John R. Deal, aka “Grizz,” will sharing the latest information on Small & Modular Reactors at the NIA in London January 30, 2012.

The event will also feature presentations by industry luminaries such as  Lord John Hutton, Chairman of the NIA, and Alexander Bychkov, Deputy Director General at the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). Sponsored by Eversheds, as a public service attendance the event is open to all for a nominal fee of GBP 75.  To register, send an email to Stephanie McKenna whose address is located on the NIA web site. 

IX Power is an safe energy and clean water technology innovation firm based in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Before starting IX Power, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for five years. He co-founded Hyperion, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, with Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass produced, self-contained 25MWe power reactor safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck after complete factory assembly. Now known as a design in the generation IV (Gen IV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was created to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to remote communities outside the U.S. and industrial and mining operations.

Before starting Hyperion, Deal served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging, and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful company spinouts from a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) technology transfer effort. Additionally, Deal served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation, and as Visiting Entrepreneur at LANL. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. He is an adjunct faculty member of the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo. He is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures.

IX Power is working with an international team of scientists and strategists to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies including the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream. The company’s main offices are in Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., and London, England.

 –IX–

What’s Next for Small Modular Reactors in the United States?

A number of countries have SMRs (Small Modular Reactors) under development.  Russia has been working on various models for some time and is famous for its RITM-200, the reactor powering its new nuclear icebreaker. Most recently South Korea announced that it has received its own state regulator approval for the SMART SMR and would soon be selling it around the world.  

Read the SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs report – link at the bottom of the page.

And, the U.S.?  The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy issued a Funding Announcement Opportunity (FOA) for a Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support Program  back on March 22, 2012. This government-industry cost share program was  for the design certification and licensing of up to two light water SMRs. Several applied, recently only one – B&W’s mPower design – was awarded funding.

On April 3, 2012, just weeks after the original FOA from the DOE came out in March, but well before the award was made, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu charged the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) with creating a subcommittee to report on what the U.S. should do above and beyond the existing FOA for two light water reactors. Secretary Chu wrote, “The broad purpose of the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs is to advise the Secretary on ways to advance this technology to achieve a global leadership role in civil nuclear technology for the United States, and ways for DOE to accelerate that role.”

Specifically, Secretary Chu charged, “Looking beyond the current DOE program authorized by Congress and begun by the FOA, this SEAB Subcommittee will: (1) Identify areas in which standards for safety, security and nonproliferation should be developed for SMRs to enhance U.S. leadership in civil nuclear energy, and (2) Identify challenges, uncertainties and risks to commercialization and provide advice on policies and other approaches that may be appropriate to manage these risks and accelerate deployment in support of national goals.”

I attended the “open meeting” in the Spring and came back and put the question to several of the “Linked-In’ groups on nuclear power:  “What would you advise the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs?”

There was a huge response.  After the discussions had gone on for a couple of months, I gathered the input with everyone’s consent and contact information and sent it in one very long letter to Dr. Nicholas M. Donofrio, Chairman of the SMR subcommittee. Before Thanksgiving, I received a letter back thanking everyone who participated on “Linked-In” and with the link to the completed report that was approved by the SEAB main committee.  Here it is: Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs.

In another blog entry – and maybe on Linked-In – we’ll discuss some of the contents of the report.  In the interim, thanks to everyone who participated in the discussion via the various nuclear groups back during the summer of 2012 …!  Keep speaking up!  Happy Holidays!

Again, here’s the pertinent links:

Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs

The subcommittee’s original marching orders

The DOE’s web site on SMRs

IX Power CEO, John R. Grizz Deal to Brief World Nuclear Power Conference on Small Modular Reactor Industry

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, 12 November 2012 – John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC will be the featured speaker on the small modular reactors (SMR) industry at Europe’s World Nuclear Power Briefing in Warsaw, Poland. Deal will present “Applications for the use of Small Modular Reactors – What is in the Cards for the Future” at the two day event December 10 and 11. 

John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC

IX Power is an energy and water technology innovation firm based in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Before starting IX Power, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for five years. He co-founded Hyperion, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, with Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass produced, self-contained 25MWe power reactor safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck after complete factory assembly. Now known as a design in the generation IV (Gen IV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was created to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to remote communities outside the U.S. and industrial and mining operations.

At Europe’s World Nuclear Power Briefing, Deal will present the current global inventory of frontrunner SMR designs and technology. He will discuss the application of SMRs, along with the implementation, licensing, safety, security, financial and the policy issues impacting their development.

Before starting Hyperion, Deal served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging, and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful company spinouts from a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) technology transfer effort. Additionally, Deal served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation, and as Visiting Entrepreneur at LANL. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. He is an adjunct faculty member of the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo. He is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures.

IX Power is working with an international team of scientists and strategists to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies including the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream. The company’s main offices are in Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., and London, England.

–IX–

IX Power Hosts Delegation of Heavy Manufacturing Executives from China

Cooperation among all countries with nuclear power needed to create the safest possible industry …

In early October IX Power hosted a trade delegation from the People’s Republic of China. The delegation, comprised of executives from heavy steel manufacturers, visited with nuclear executives in Washington, D.C. throughout the week exchanging information about capabilities and possible business opportunities.

Some of the members of the delegation met at the Washington offices of respected engineering firm Burns & Roe Enterprises. Nancy Shi, director of IX Power’s China operations, stands next to Burns & Roe principal Randall Roe.

John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power (pictured far left) said, “Nuclear power will continue to play an important role in the mix of clean energy technologies that will be needed to keep the lights on for peaceful nations. As the global nuclear industry strives to create ever safer plants, it is important that the major players work together to combine and benefit from each others resources and safety innovations. This includes the ability to access large, high-quality steel components for building nuclear power plants — something China has developed and that the U.S. and other countries, having ceased production of many of these larger components, now requires. But, it’s not just the U.S. that needs quality large steel forgings. All of the countries dedicated to improving their nuclear power plants and creating new ones, need resources that, without China’s offerings, are extremely limited. This trade delegation is the first step in an effort to expose the rest of the world to the high-quality work that China’s heavy manufacturing is capable of producing and for offering the nuclear industry alternatives to the precariously small resources for these items that currently exist.”   

There are 435 nuclear units in the world today with a capacity to create 370,000 megawatts of electricity. With 104 units, the United States currently has more than any other country. Other leaders in the use of nuclear power include France (58 units), Japan (50), Russia (33), India (20), (South) Korea (23), Canada (18), China (16) and the United Kingdom (16). According to reports from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) these countries and many that do not have nuclear power plants now, will be building additional plants. But China perhaps has the most far-reaching plans for nuclear power. The country has seen the advantages of creating clean, affordable electricity with nuclear and is dedicated to constructing more than 100 plants in the coming years. (And, this count is just for large nuclear power plants. The manufacturing opportunity accompanying the SMR – small modular reactor – industry is even greater.) That is why Asian manufacturing sectors are now committed to creating the highest-quality heavy nuclear components, including pipes, boilers, and containment vessels.

In addition to improving energy security and mitigating the effects of climate change by offering an alternative to burning fossil fuels, nuclear power also has essential applications beyond producing electricity. Nuclear energy is also used for seawater desalination, district heating, and in creating heat for industrial processes. Additionally, nuclear technology and innovation continues to be vitally important in medical treatments, and is being developed for food security and safety, agriculture, and environmental monitoring.          

“Dark Knight Rises” Batman movie does infant SMR industry no favors

 I’ve seen all the other Batman movies, so, I asked my own “silver knight” to take me to see The Dark Knight Rises. Pretty good movie! 

The Dark Knight Rises did the nuclear industry no favors!  See it and cringe!

The Dark Knight Rises did the nuclear industry no favors! See it and cringe!

(WARNING: Spoiler Alert)

But, I couldn’t believe it …Holy Plot Twist Batman! I cringed when we got to the part where they introduced the little nuclear reactor.  ACK! The Nolan Brothers had written in Wayne Enterprises Applied Science Division developing an SMR (Small Modular nuclear power Reactor) that was used by the bad guys to threaten Gotham. In the movie, the bad guys gain access to the SMR and had a scientist magically presto changeo TURN IT INTO A FUSION NUCLEAR BOMB in what seemed like a turn of a screw, and in the space of a few minutes.  As the movie progressed, and I became sore from my date nudging me with his elbow, darn it if the characters didn’t flip the sucker onto the back of the truck and drive around Gotham with it …!

GROAN!  CRINGE!  I know it’s just a movie and YOU know it’s just a movie, but golly, gosh darn, The Dark Knight Rises sure doesn’t help the rise of the fledging SMR industry!  

Fusion?! Ack!  Fusion bomb?! Ack!  Quickly retrofitting a power reactor to be a bomb?! Ack!  Throwing it in a truck and driving it around the city?!  

Double Ack! The fairy tale spun further and further out of control. I wanted to bang my head on the seat in front of me. I don’t recall any other recent movies featuring a small nuclear power being turned into a bomb, and I sure wish this one had not.

Holy Toledo Batman! The big weapon in The Dark Knight Rises is a FICTITIOUS fusion reactor that's quickly converted into a bomb! (Not going to happen, folks. No worries!)

Holy Toledo Batman! The big weapon in The Dark Knight Rises is a FICTITIOUS fusion reactor that's quickly converted into a bomb! (Not going to happen, folks. No worries!)

Misconceptions about nuclear power abound today. Misconceptions and fear about SMRs, I’m afraid, will no doubt skyrocket after everyone gets around to seeing this movie.  If you ask me, the release of this Batman flick hands the Union of Concerned Scientists a loaded Batpistol to scare the uninformed majority into opposing the development of SMRs. 

This movie could be a pain in the collective butts of those of us who believe SMRs have a place in the future of clean energy for our planet and may come back to haunt the nuclear industry – for both big and small power reactors.  I’m pretty sure it will – just as sure as at the end of every Batman movie, the dark knight rises.

We DO approve of the motorcycle, however. Here I am borrowing it. Len wants one for Christmas. I said I would get the wheels for him, but not the reactor ....

We DO approve of the motorcycle, however. Here I am borrowing it. Len wants one for Christmas. I said I would get the wheels for him, but not the reactor ...

Deborah Deal-Blackwell

Lots of comments on Small Modular Reactors – join in!

 

LEAVE COMMENTS ON OUR BLOG, or go to the LINKED-IN Page where it was started:

CLICK HERE to join the Discussion on LINKED-IN

There’s a hot discussion, with lots of good input, on SMRs that’s on the Linked-In group page “Nuclear Power – the Next Generation” Group. The discussion has been going on for some time now and is buried in the back. Anyone new to this group would not know its going on – so I’m just providing a little heads -up here and a direct link to the discussion…

IX Power is going to run off all the comments and send them over to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB), Small Modular Reactor Subcommittee (SMR) at the U.S. DOE  (Department of Energy).  This subcommittee apparently began its work in March 2012 and is to report back to the parent SEAB by this coming October. We will run off the comments at the end of June.

Any questions, just let us know!  Thank you!  Background on the SEAB follows below …

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