Deborah Deal-Blackwell to present “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” at Denver Innovators Workshop on June 12

   

Deborah Deal-Blackwell

Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR

     People involved in new business startups, inventors and innovators, even those that have been in business for some time – all can benefit by attending the free Denver Innovators Workshop session “Getting Started on Your P.R. & Marketing” on Wednesday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m. at Cluster Studios. Presented by veteran marketer Deborah Deal-Blackwell, APR, the two-hour event will cover how to start marketing your product or service and what business owners should do first, explore what business owners can do on their own, and when and how to hire a public relations, marketing or advertising firm. In addition, the Workshop will also present the latest available information about business exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities at the upcoming Denver Startup Street Faire in conjunction with Denver Startup Week. To ensure a seat, attendees should RSVP for the event at: http://www.denverinnovators.org.

     Deborah Deal-Blackwell is an Accredited Public Relations practitioner (APR) with 30+ years creating and handling public relations and marketing campaigns for a diverse group of clients from the Caribbean to Moscow, Russia and all across the United States.  Her early career in television was followed by leadership positions at two of Florida’s top advertising and PR firms. She also owned an operated her own successful public relations firm and was the CEO of Angel Flight Southeast, a regional non-profit. From her home base outside Washington, D.C., she has represented clients, including the Hyperion Power Generation small modular reactor company, before the U.S. Congress, Department of Energy, and many other federal agencies. Currently, she is the CEO of the non-profit IX Power Foundation and consults with a handful of clients offering innovative new products. She is a member of the National Press Club and the Public Relations Society of America, both in Washington, D.C., the Friends of the Gum Spring Library, and other organizations.

The Denver Innovators Workshop is a not-for-profit group of innovators and inventors, scientists and geeks, business professionals and students, who came together in 2012 for the purpose of helping each other succeed. In this process, the Workshop participants aspire to actually raise the number of new products, services and companies in the Greater Denver area, while boosting the area’s reputation for innovation.

In addition to its monthly meetings at Cluster Studios, the Denver Innovators Workshop is hosting the Denver Startup Street Faire.  Billed as a “Public Science, Technology, & Manufacturing Faire for Adults & Kids of All Ages,” the Denver Startup Street Faire is being held in conjunction with Denver Startup Week, and with support from the Denver Office of Economic Development and the nonprofit IX Power Foundation. The event will provide inventors, innovators and new businesses the opportunity to showcase their products and services to the public downtown at the Wellington Webb Building on Saturday, September 21, 2013.

 Press Contact: Claire Paulette        Claire at IXPowerFoundation dot org or (505) 661-1000, ext. 902.

Findings on Fukushima Radioactivity: No Risk to Health

The Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident contaminated the soil of densely populated regions in Fukushima Prefecture with radioactive cesium, which poses significant risks of internal and external exposure to the residents. If we apply the knowledge of post-Chernobyl accident studies, internal exposures in excess of a few mSv/y would be expected to be frequent in Fukushima.

Extensive whole-body-counter surveys (n F 32,811) carried out at the Hirata Central Hospital between October 2011 and November 2012, however show that the internal exposure levels of residents are much lower than estimated. In particular, the first sampling-bias-free assessment of the internal exposure of children in the town of Miharu, Fukushima, shows that the 137Cs body burdens of all children (n F 1,383, ages 6–15, covering 95% of children enrolled in town-operated schools) were below the detection limit of 300 Bq/body in the fall of 2012. These results are not conclusive for the prefecture as a whole, but are consistent with results obtained from other municipalities in the prefecture, and with prefectural data.

Read the Full Report Here
Keywords: Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident, radioactive cesium, whole-body counting,
committed effective dose

Die Bundesregierung handelt dumm

For a culture so steeped in logic and science, it’s surprising Germany has made the most expensive and silly decision concerning its energy independence. Not only will retiring their nuclear power fleet cost them ~$1.5 TRILLION, they will be forced to purchase electricity from neighboring countries such as France, which will continue to generate almost all of its baseload via safe, clean, affordable nuclear power.

Dummkopfs!

NUCLEAR POLICIES: Trillion-euro cost of German energy transition
Germany’s plan to transform its energy system to one reliant on renewable power as it phases out nuclear energy could cost up to €1 trillion, German energy and environment minister Peter Altmaier has publicly admitted.

Still Kicking the Nuclear Waste Can Down the Road

Perplexed? I’m beyond perplexed!  Normally when you fork over funds for something, you get something in return. But not when it comes to the energy business and the current state of U.S. politics!  For years nuclear power plants have been paying into a U.S. Department of Energy program to take care of their nuclear waste – to safely store it.  So far the nuclear industry has put $28 billion into the coffers for this purpose. This program came into law with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 which called for the construction and maintenance of multiple waste deposit sites, and then in 1987 an amendment to the Act directed that a single depository be built – Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

Because nuclear power does not pollute the air with harmful emissions, it is considered by many to be a “GREEN” technology. However, the U.S. must decide a course of action for the waste from its nuclear power plants if nuclear is going to be a viable energy technology for the future.

But guess what?  Because of partisan politics, the U.S. government, still — 26 years later — has not begun to take that waste and store it; not at Yucca, not anywhere.  The waste of our country’s nuclear power plants is sitting around all over the countryside next to each nuclear power plant. Now, if YOU had paid $28 billion for someone to take out your trash and properly store it so no one would accidentally get hurt by it, and 26 years later, the contractor still had not done it, wouldn’t you be mad?

True, some of the nuclear utilities have sued the U.S. government to get that money back and thus far they have retrieved about $2.6 billion. They could probably use those funds to ensure that their on-site storage facilities are safely maintained. But, they had to burn a lot of “people energy” and time and money on legal fees to do so.  More legal suits are still in the works and Washington continues to kick our country’s nuclear waste disposal issue down the road with occasional help kicking that can from entities, such as the Blue Ribbon Commission which has been studying alternatives to opening the doors at Yucca Mountain. 

Now, bless-their-hearts (I always say that about people who are forced to declare obviously wrong decisions) the folks at the U.S. Department of Energy, have come out and said that not only do the utilities still have to pay this fee, the DOE is not even going to adjust it down one little bit …! The utilities still have to continue to pay it – even though they continue to get nothing for it and no one else is getting anything either – certainly not the individuals like you and me paying monthly electric bills. 

WHAT?  How is this right? Plan and simple, it’s NOT.  It’s politics played to benefit the few, instead of benefitting everyone and the future of our energy security.  Would someone please pick up the can of the nuclear waste issue and quit kicking it down the road?
 Click here for a good background story   

Grizz Deal to speak on Small & Modular Reactors in London at NIA conference

What’s happening with Small & Modular Reactors now?  Find out when John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC will provide an overview on the small modular reactors (SMR) industry at the Nuclear Industry Association’s “Near Term SMRs in the U.K.” event on January 30 in London.      

John R. Deal, aka “Grizz,” will sharing the latest information on Small & Modular Reactors at the NIA in London January 30, 2012.

The event will also feature presentations by industry luminaries such as  Lord John Hutton, Chairman of the NIA, and Alexander Bychkov, Deputy Director General at the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). Sponsored by Eversheds, as a public service attendance the event is open to all for a nominal fee of GBP 75.  To register, send an email to Stephanie McKenna whose address is located on the NIA web site. 

IX Power is an safe energy and clean water technology innovation firm based in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Before starting IX Power, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for five years. He co-founded Hyperion, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, with Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass produced, self-contained 25MWe power reactor safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck after complete factory assembly. Now known as a design in the generation IV (Gen IV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was created to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to remote communities outside the U.S. and industrial and mining operations.

Before starting Hyperion, Deal served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging, and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful company spinouts from a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) technology transfer effort. Additionally, Deal served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation, and as Visiting Entrepreneur at LANL. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. He is an adjunct faculty member of the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo. He is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures.

IX Power is working with an international team of scientists and strategists to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies including the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream. The company’s main offices are in Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., and London, England.

 –IX–

What’s Next for Small Modular Reactors in the United States?

A number of countries have SMRs (Small Modular Reactors) under development.  Russia has been working on various models for some time and is famous for its RITM-200, the reactor powering its new nuclear icebreaker. Most recently South Korea announced that it has received its own state regulator approval for the SMART SMR and would soon be selling it around the world.  

Read the SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs report – link at the bottom of the page.

And, the U.S.?  The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy issued a Funding Announcement Opportunity (FOA) for a Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support Program  back on March 22, 2012. This government-industry cost share program was  for the design certification and licensing of up to two light water SMRs. Several applied, recently only one – B&W’s mPower design – was awarded funding.

On April 3, 2012, just weeks after the original FOA from the DOE came out in March, but well before the award was made, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu charged the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) with creating a subcommittee to report on what the U.S. should do above and beyond the existing FOA for two light water reactors. Secretary Chu wrote, “The broad purpose of the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs is to advise the Secretary on ways to advance this technology to achieve a global leadership role in civil nuclear technology for the United States, and ways for DOE to accelerate that role.”

Specifically, Secretary Chu charged, “Looking beyond the current DOE program authorized by Congress and begun by the FOA, this SEAB Subcommittee will: (1) Identify areas in which standards for safety, security and nonproliferation should be developed for SMRs to enhance U.S. leadership in civil nuclear energy, and (2) Identify challenges, uncertainties and risks to commercialization and provide advice on policies and other approaches that may be appropriate to manage these risks and accelerate deployment in support of national goals.”

I attended the “open meeting” in the Spring and came back and put the question to several of the “Linked-In’ groups on nuclear power:  “What would you advise the SEAB subcommittee on SMRs?”

There was a huge response.  After the discussions had gone on for a couple of months, I gathered the input with everyone’s consent and contact information and sent it in one very long letter to Dr. Nicholas M. Donofrio, Chairman of the SMR subcommittee. Before Thanksgiving, I received a letter back thanking everyone who participated on “Linked-In” and with the link to the completed report that was approved by the SEAB main committee.  Here it is: Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs.

In another blog entry – and maybe on Linked-In – we’ll discuss some of the contents of the report.  In the interim, thanks to everyone who participated in the discussion via the various nuclear groups back during the summer of 2012 …!  Keep speaking up!  Happy Holidays!

Again, here’s the pertinent links:

Report from SEAB Subcommittee on SMRs

The subcommittee’s original marching orders

The DOE’s web site on SMRs

IX Power CEO, John R. Grizz Deal to Brief World Nuclear Power Conference on Small Modular Reactor Industry

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, 12 November 2012 – John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC will be the featured speaker on the small modular reactors (SMR) industry at Europe’s World Nuclear Power Briefing in Warsaw, Poland. Deal will present “Applications for the use of Small Modular Reactors – What is in the Cards for the Future” at the two day event December 10 and 11. 

John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power LLC

IX Power is an energy and water technology innovation firm based in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Before starting IX Power, Deal was the CEO of Hyperion Power Generation for five years. He co-founded Hyperion, the first modern SMR company to approach the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission with its SMR concept, with Dr. Otis (Pete) Peterson, Dr. Robert Libutti, and Deborah Deal-Blackwell. The objective of Hyperion Power was to introduce a mass produced, self-contained 25MWe power reactor safe and compact enough to be shipped on the back of a truck after complete factory assembly. Now known as a design in the generation IV (Gen IV) class of reactors, the Hyperion reactor was created to bring safe, emission-free clean nuclear power to remote communities outside the U.S. and industrial and mining operations.

At Europe’s World Nuclear Power Briefing, Deal will present the current global inventory of frontrunner SMR designs and technology. He will discuss the application of SMRs, along with the implementation, licensing, safety, security, financial and the policy issues impacting their development.

Before starting Hyperion, Deal served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging, and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful company spinouts from a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) technology transfer effort. Additionally, Deal served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation, and as Visiting Entrepreneur at LANL. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. He is an adjunct faculty member of the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo. He is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures.

IX Power is working with an international team of scientists and strategists to develop and bring to market a number of ground-breaking technologies including the IX Power OrganiClear system that removes dangerous organic hydrocarbons from water produced by oil & gas, mining, and industrial processes without creating a hydrocarbon waste stream. The company’s main offices are in Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., and London, England.

–IX–

IX Power Hosts Delegation of Heavy Manufacturing Executives from China

Cooperation among all countries with nuclear power needed to create the safest possible industry …

In early October IX Power hosted a trade delegation from the People’s Republic of China. The delegation, comprised of executives from heavy steel manufacturers, visited with nuclear executives in Washington, D.C. throughout the week exchanging information about capabilities and possible business opportunities.

Some of the members of the delegation met at the Washington offices of respected engineering firm Burns & Roe Enterprises. Nancy Shi, director of IX Power’s China operations, stands next to Burns & Roe principal Randall Roe.

John R. Grizz Deal, CEO of IX Power (pictured far left) said, “Nuclear power will continue to play an important role in the mix of clean energy technologies that will be needed to keep the lights on for peaceful nations. As the global nuclear industry strives to create ever safer plants, it is important that the major players work together to combine and benefit from each others resources and safety innovations. This includes the ability to access large, high-quality steel components for building nuclear power plants — something China has developed and that the U.S. and other countries, having ceased production of many of these larger components, now requires. But, it’s not just the U.S. that needs quality large steel forgings. All of the countries dedicated to improving their nuclear power plants and creating new ones, need resources that, without China’s offerings, are extremely limited. This trade delegation is the first step in an effort to expose the rest of the world to the high-quality work that China’s heavy manufacturing is capable of producing and for offering the nuclear industry alternatives to the precariously small resources for these items that currently exist.”   

There are 435 nuclear units in the world today with a capacity to create 370,000 megawatts of electricity. With 104 units, the United States currently has more than any other country. Other leaders in the use of nuclear power include France (58 units), Japan (50), Russia (33), India (20), (South) Korea (23), Canada (18), China (16) and the United Kingdom (16). According to reports from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) these countries and many that do not have nuclear power plants now, will be building additional plants. But China perhaps has the most far-reaching plans for nuclear power. The country has seen the advantages of creating clean, affordable electricity with nuclear and is dedicated to constructing more than 100 plants in the coming years. (And, this count is just for large nuclear power plants. The manufacturing opportunity accompanying the SMR – small modular reactor – industry is even greater.) That is why Asian manufacturing sectors are now committed to creating the highest-quality heavy nuclear components, including pipes, boilers, and containment vessels.

In addition to improving energy security and mitigating the effects of climate change by offering an alternative to burning fossil fuels, nuclear power also has essential applications beyond producing electricity. Nuclear energy is also used for seawater desalination, district heating, and in creating heat for industrial processes. Additionally, nuclear technology and innovation continues to be vitally important in medical treatments, and is being developed for food security and safety, agriculture, and environmental monitoring.          

Y-12 Protestors Should Refocus Efforts on more Insidious Threat – Global Warming & Climate Change

The protestors that cut through the fence and broke into a secure area to deface buildings at the Y-12 National Security Complex, the Oak Ridge, Tennessee facility* that stores and processes uranium, should consider refocusing their efforts on a more insidious threat to the future of the planet.  While all-out nuclear war would indeed be a global disaster, it is less likely to occur than in fact the global disaster which IS apparently full-speed ahead and is not being taken seriously enough.

For much of the planet, Climate Change is going to mean either too much water — or too little.

What the little old nun and her two middle-aged cohorts should focus on is Climate Change.  But, so should we all.

Here’s what we have to look forward to with Climate Change:  longer droughts, bigger floods, the loss of coastline and cities that are on the coast, acidification of the oceans and the eventual death of many species of sea creatures including those we depend upon as a food source, hotter temperatures, more storms – stronger hurricanes and tornadoes, worse pest problems, more disease – including the regeneration of some diseases like the bubonic plague, more and bigger wildfires, more air pollution, less food for everyone, mass extinctions,  and in general, less water where it’s needed – more where it’s not.

The problem with the Climate Change problem, what makes it so dangerous, is that it’s sneaky.  Scientist tried to tell us it was coming, but we – the United States’ “we” here – didn’t take it seriously because we didn’t see it in our daily lives … I mean who cares about the Polar bears?!   As long as we can still get a good steak at Longhorn, let the bears swim, for crying out loud. (being facetious here)  Americans continue to be Americans – good people, but historically, until the crisis is staring us in the face, we’re pretty complacent on the whole. WE Americans can be summed up as Winston Churchill said: You can always count on Americans to do the right thing – after they’ve tried everything else.

Aah, but this summer has seen the crisis brought to our own backyards.  This Summer has provided THE HOTTEST JULY EVER in the United States.   And, we ALL felt it.

Has this GLOBAL WARMING been caused by mankind or is it a naturally occurring cycle?  WHO CARES?!

Wildfires

Wildfires did a lot of damage to the U.S. in 2012. The coming years will see even more so get used to it.

it doesn’t really matter now because global warming has caused a climate change that many scientists such as those at the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change believe cannot be stopped.  We can still “mitigate” global warming if we act fast, but the ball is rolling downhill.  Mitigation can put a few bumps on the hill to slow climate change and keep the situation from being QUITE SO BAD, but it’s still going to happen.

Let’s take a moment here to define some terms that we’re using in this, and future blog posts at IX Power.

Global Warming is:  Not the same thing as Climate Change! (They frequently are used interchangeably, but that is incorrect.) Global warming is the human-instigated rise in temperatures caused by too much carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Climate Change is: the EFFECTS that Global Warming has on the earth.  Climate Change is the effects on the earth’s natural processes and the impacts that are the result – stronger storms, worse droughts, melting polar ice, etc.

Mitigation is the set of actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions that generate global warming.

Adaptation is the actions that we can take to reduce the impacts of climate change – rising sea levels, strong storms, worse droughts, etc.

Mitigation is important – yes, we should continue to do things to reduce greenhouse gases – but the horse is out of the barn.  Scientists, including those at the IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change believe that even if we took really drastic measures to reduce global warming today, we are still going to have climate change and its impacts.  But, of course, since no one is taking drastic measures, we are most likely on our way to a slow hell.  We need to now focus at least as much effort on ADAPTING to climate change, as we should to mitigating global warming. Actually, we must do more, since not enough is being done to mitigate global warming.  

ADAPTATION – getting ready for the next 40 years so that fewer people, animals and ecosystems have to die, should be the concern of not just the Y-12 protestors, but all of us.  And I mean ALL.  Just because you are wealthy, or your corporation is big and healthy, does not mean you shouldn’t care.  EVERYONE is going to be impacted.  

Stay tuned to this blog – we’ll be talking more – not just about MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING, but ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE as well …

*  According to the Y-12 web site: The Y‑12 National Security Complex is one of four production facilities in the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nuclear Security Enterprise. Their unique emphasis is the processing and storage of uranium and development of technologies associated with those activities.

“Dark Knight Rises” Batman movie does infant SMR industry no favors

 I’ve seen all the other Batman movies, so, I asked my own “silver knight” to take me to see The Dark Knight Rises. Pretty good movie! 

The Dark Knight Rises did the nuclear industry no favors!  See it and cringe!

The Dark Knight Rises did the nuclear industry no favors! See it and cringe!

(WARNING: Spoiler Alert)

But, I couldn’t believe it …Holy Plot Twist Batman! I cringed when we got to the part where they introduced the little nuclear reactor.  ACK! The Nolan Brothers had written in Wayne Enterprises Applied Science Division developing an SMR (Small Modular nuclear power Reactor) that was used by the bad guys to threaten Gotham. In the movie, the bad guys gain access to the SMR and had a scientist magically presto changeo TURN IT INTO A FUSION NUCLEAR BOMB in what seemed like a turn of a screw, and in the space of a few minutes.  As the movie progressed, and I became sore from my date nudging me with his elbow, darn it if the characters didn’t flip the sucker onto the back of the truck and drive around Gotham with it …!

GROAN!  CRINGE!  I know it’s just a movie and YOU know it’s just a movie, but golly, gosh darn, The Dark Knight Rises sure doesn’t help the rise of the fledging SMR industry!  

Fusion?! Ack!  Fusion bomb?! Ack!  Quickly retrofitting a power reactor to be a bomb?! Ack!  Throwing it in a truck and driving it around the city?!  

Double Ack! The fairy tale spun further and further out of control. I wanted to bang my head on the seat in front of me. I don’t recall any other recent movies featuring a small nuclear power being turned into a bomb, and I sure wish this one had not.

Holy Toledo Batman! The big weapon in The Dark Knight Rises is a FICTITIOUS fusion reactor that's quickly converted into a bomb! (Not going to happen, folks. No worries!)

Holy Toledo Batman! The big weapon in The Dark Knight Rises is a FICTITIOUS fusion reactor that's quickly converted into a bomb! (Not going to happen, folks. No worries!)

Misconceptions about nuclear power abound today. Misconceptions and fear about SMRs, I’m afraid, will no doubt skyrocket after everyone gets around to seeing this movie.  If you ask me, the release of this Batman flick hands the Union of Concerned Scientists a loaded Batpistol to scare the uninformed majority into opposing the development of SMRs. 

This movie could be a pain in the collective butts of those of us who believe SMRs have a place in the future of clean energy for our planet and may come back to haunt the nuclear industry – for both big and small power reactors.  I’m pretty sure it will – just as sure as at the end of every Batman movie, the dark knight rises.

We DO approve of the motorcycle, however. Here I am borrowing it. Len wants one for Christmas. I said I would get the wheels for him, but not the reactor ....

We DO approve of the motorcycle, however. Here I am borrowing it. Len wants one for Christmas. I said I would get the wheels for him, but not the reactor ...

Deborah Deal-Blackwell